Daniel T. Willingham, Elizabeth W. Dunn. What Neuroimaging and Brain Localization Can Do, Cannot Do, and Should Not Do for Social Psychology

Daniel T. Willingham, Elizabeth W. Dunn. What Neuroimaging and Brain Localization Can Do, Cannot Do, and Should Not Do for Social Psychology


The purpose of this article is to examine why social psychologists should be interested in localizing psychological processes in the brain. The intersection of neuroscience and social psychology has been vibrant for many years, and substantial progress has been made in understanding the relationship of the social mind and the body’s physiology (for a number of examples, see Cacioppo, Tassinary, & Berntson, 2000). There is, however, a new enthusiasm for the integration of neuroscience and social psychology. This increased interest may be adduced by the recent (2001) request by the National Institute of Mental Health for applications that combine social psychology and neuroscience and by the increasing number of social neuroscience presentations at conferences. This increased interest has been noted in professional journals (in addition to this special section of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, see Adolphs, 1999; Ochsner & Lieberman, 2001) and in the press (Azar, 2001). Some change in zeitgeist seems to be at hand.


Просмотреть документ

 (no votes)

Keywords: Neuroeconomics

Printable version

Go back

Go to top