Heather Antecol, Ozkan Eren, Serkan Ozbeklik. Peer Effects in Disadvantaged Primary Schools: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

Heather Antecol, Ozkan Eren, Serkan Ozbeklik. Peer Effects in Disadvantaged  Primary Schools: Evidence from a  Randomized Experiment


Throughout the past several decades there has been a nation-wide debate focusing on how to improve student achievement in the United States. The debate was fueled by the influential Coleman Report of 1966 which questioned the long-standing belief that school funding was a key determinant of student achievement. The report instead highlighted the importance of alternative determinants—e.g., family background and socio-economic status, teacher quality, and peer quality—which could have differential effects on students in schools in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods relative to students in schools in more economically advantaged neighborhoods (Coleman 1966). Not surprisingly, the report spawned a flurry of new research among social scientists, as well as a shift in policy-makers’ education goals. However, it continues to be the case that there is little, if any, agreement about which specific education policies are more effective in improving student achievement (for reviews of the literature see Hanushek 2006; Hanushek and Rivkin 2006)


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Keywords: Experimental Economics

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