International Conference on Marketing & Consumer Behavior. May 17, 2013 – May 18, 2013

22.04.2013
International Conference on Marketing & Consumer Behavior. May 17, 2013 – May 18, 2013

Groups of consumers have been the main focus of marketing activity. As an example, the basic idea behind segmentation, one of the most important marketing processes, is that consumers are not all alike. They have different characteristics and lifestyles, which calls for the need to group them (and the market they represent for a respective good) in homogeneous segments so that marketing actions can be better targeted and obtain more effective results. We may call this type of marketing, market-centric marketing.

Groups of consumers have been the main focus of marketing activity. As an example, the basic idea behind segmentation, one of the most important marketing processes, is that consumers are not all alike. They have different characteristics and lifestyles, which calls for the need to group them (and the market they represent for a respective good) in homogeneous segments so that marketing actions can be better targeted and obtain more effective results. We may call this type of marketing, market-centric marketing.

More recently there has been a growing concern with the consumer as an individual. Expressions such as “personalization”, “relationship marketing”, and “co-creation” among others have gained considerable attention from researchers and practitioners. The assumption that “consumers are not alike” takes a step further and consumers are seen as human beings with very specific needs and desires, almost unique or unrepeatable. Each consumer should feel that the marketing action targeted to reach him/her was designed specifically for him/her. This may be called consumer-centric marketing.

These two approaches have significant (and different) impacts on marketing practices and marketing management.

In market-centric marketing, approaching consumers as a “market” means that companies need to look for characteristics that group consumers and try to know them very well, as a group. In this context, operational marketing tasks are directed to an “anonymous” mass, although a targeted one.

In consumer-centric marketing, seeing consumers as unique human beings, whose specific needs and desires need to be fulfilled, demands for a different, more “surgical” approach, even in more operational marketing tasks.

Although the latter is gaining supporters, the operational support is much more demanding in terms of processes, human and even financial resources, leaving it difficult for companies to being capable of implementing such a marketing philosophy.

This duality is the main focus of our conference as it raises very important questions still unanswered that we invite participants to address.

Register here

Printable version