Paul W. Glimcher, Ernst Fehr, Colin Camerer, Russell Alan Poldrack. Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and the Brain

Paul W. Glimcher, Ernst Fehr, Colin Camerer, Russell Alan Poldrack. Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and the Brain

"Neuroeconomics is a large, beautifully produced and ambitious book that aims to be to for this emerging field what Gazzaniga's The Cognitive Neurosciences is for the emerged one. It offers essays on the history of the discipline; reflections on whether (and what, and why) it offers anything of unique value to science; and reports of cutting-edge research in a number of areas including: the neural mechanisms of choice, valuation and social decision-making; the evolutionary origins of economic behavior; and the various ways of using neuroscience data to adjudicate between competing theories in behavioral economics." - Journal of Economic Psychology (Feb 2010)

'Neuroeconomics is a timely collection of papers by leading researchers from both sides of the border between economics and neuroscience. The papers reflect a high level of focused communication between scholars in fields that until recently studied decision-making at different levels using different methods, with little fruitful interaction. The book should be of interest to anyone who would like to know how a deeper understanding of process can enrich and refine economic theories of decision-making; to anyone who would like to know how economic theory can inform research in neuroscience; or simply to anyone who has ever wondered about the mechanics of how decisions are made in the brain, and what it means about human nature.' - Vince Crawford, Distinguished Professor of Economics, University of California, San Diego, USA

'Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and the Brain is a landmark publication in the rapidly expanding field of neuroeconomics. The list of contributors is exceptional.  The content is completely up to date and forward looking.  For the foreseeable future, this will be the standard reference for newcomers and experienced researchers alike.' - David Laibson, Professor of Economics, Harvard University, USA

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